Why You Need At Least $2 Million of Third-Party Liability Coverage In Your Automobile Insurance Policy

What is the main purpose of third-party liability?

Third party liability coverage in an automobile insurance policy will cover you if you are at-fault in a motor vehicle accident. In addition to giving you peace of mind, the main purpose of third-party liability coverage is to protect your assets in the event damages are assessed against you.

Standard practice for insurance companies and insurance brokers in Alberta is to recommend $1 million in third-party liability coverage in an automobile insurance policy. As a personal injury law firm, we urge you not to default to this standard practice, but rather purchase $2 million or more in third-party liability insurance. Continue reading

How Much is My Personal Injury Claim Worth?

For many people injured in an accident, pursuing compensation for their injuries is a necessary part of their road to recovery. The first question we often get asked when meeting with an injured person is, “How much is my claim worth?” Unfortunately, the answer is often “It depends.” We know that can be frustrating to hear, but there are many factors that go into evaluating the value of a claim, and every case is different. Below are just some of the factors that may affect how much you might receive from a court in damages if you sue the person or persons responsible for your injuries. Continue reading

Auto Insurance Reform Online Survey (Deadline: March 6, 2020). No-fault Insurance Will Have Serious Consequences for Injured People. What You Need to Know.

You may have heard that the Alberta Government is looking to reform the province’s Auto Insurance system. An online survey has been set up to collect input from Albertans. No details have been provided on what the new system would look like, but there has been reference to moving to a no-fault system.

We encourage all Albertans to take part in the survey and let the Government know what you want (and what you don’t want). You can find the link to the survey at the bottom of this post.

Before you provide your input, it’s important to understand in practical terms what a shift to a no-fault system will mean if you, or a loved one, is seriously injured in a car accident.

Continue reading

Confused About Alberta’s Minor Injury Regulation?

In 2004, the insurance industry successfully lobbied the Alberta provincial government to “cap” damages payable to motor vehicle accident victims for minor injuries. Since that time, some insurance representatives have argued that the top damage award payable under the cap, which in 2019 is $5,202, is awarded only to those who have suffered the most serious “minor injuries,” and they then attempt to bargain down from this minimal sum. Some insurance representatives may also take the position that your injuries clearly fall within the “cap,” when in fact they do not, either due to the nature of the injuries or because the injuries resulted in a serious impairment. Continue reading

Four Questions To Ask Your Personal Injury Lawyer

Being the victim of an accident or suffering a personal injury through no fault of your own may entitle you to legal compensation and the financial assistance needed to cover the cost of medical care, reimburse you for lost wages or deal with other matters pertaining to your injury. Retaining the services of an experienced accident lawyer can be of critical importance for clients who elect to move forward with a case, claim or other proceedings. Clients who have a better understanding of what to ask during an initial consultation may be far more likely to choose the most suitable law representation to their case. Continue reading

Do’s and Don’ts For Your Defence Medical Examination

If you are in a car accident that resulted in injuries and have decided to retain a lawyer, they will begin an action on your behalf to recover damages intended to compensate you for your injuries. Your lawyer will ask for medical reports from your doctor, and possibly from specialist doctors. To establish the extent of your injuries, the defendants (the opposing side) also have the right to have a doctor of their choice examine you. This examination is known as a “defence medical examination” or DME for short. These doctors will prepare an expert report in which they will give their opinion on the extent and severity of your injuries, as well as testify in court for the opposition if your case comes to a trial. Continue reading